Thursday, February 27, 2014

Spitfire climbing


12 comments:

  1. Sigh, the Spitfire. You know how I feel about that bird.

    Beautiful c w. Thanks!

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  2. I want one.

    I was in Reno earlier in the week and the executive staff at Reno-Stead Airport (site of the annual Reno Air Races) promised me a VIP seat in their pavilion, center runway. I think that they were impressed when they first met me and asked if I'd ever seen the races. My response was that I'd rather do that than watch the Super Bowl from the field on the winning team's side. COME ON SEPTEMBER!

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  3. Climbing? Or falling tail first? Hard to tell without the white scarf out in the wind.

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  4. I didn't know they were able to do this. By the way, we are in the middle of listening to A Higher Call. Excellent. Out of the 28,000 German pilots in WWII, only 1,200 survived the war.

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    Replies
    1. Most likely the airplane is performing a loop or an immelman and the photographer snapped the picture as he went through the verticle. Even WWI fighters were able to perform those maneuvers, in fact the immelman was named for Max Immelman, the German Ace. who invented the maneuver in WWI.

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    2. the immelman was named for Max Immelman, the German Ace. who invented the maneuver in WWI.

      I remember that now. Thanks.

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  5. Yes, and the German pilot in the book who spared the American bomber and who fought courageously throughout the whole war was blamed for not stopping the bombings and had a difficult time obtaining even the most basic job after the war.

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